It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?

Lately, I enjoy  “book blogging” much more than any other sort of non-fiction writing, so I think I will do some of that on a more regular basis.

Sheila at Book Journey  hosts the weekly meme “It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?” Since I’d like to be a little more focused with my reading list, I’m going to give it a try.

This Week I’m Reading:

The Snowman’s Children by Glen Hirshberg

The Snowman’s Children tells the story of an incident from one man’s childhood in the 1970s, when a serial killer called The Snowman stalked the streets of suburban Detroit. The incident, a result of good but woefully misguided juvenile intentions, forced his family to leave their home, and eventually forced him, at age twenty-nine, to return to his hometown in search of three old friends. (Goodreads)

Glen Hirshberg is my current writer crush. If I had money, I’d tentatively work my way through his back catalog one Amazon purchase at a time. Since I’m poor, I’ve been trolling Paperback Swap for whatever I can get. This is Hirshberg’s first novel. I’ve previously only read his short stories and I’m eager to see how this tale will run its course over 300 pages.

Short Story of the Week:

Probably one of the following:
“In the Dark” by Ian Nichols
“There will come soft rains” by Ray Bradbury
Or something from the Steven Millhauser anthology

The Usual:

A poem & two chapters of A Clash of Kings.

What I Read Last Week:

Worked on Through Darkest America  by Neal Barrett Jr. and started From the Dust Remembered by Ray Bradbury. I’ll get back to them after I swoon like a love-lorn teenager over my crush. The short story I read was “Eisenheim the Illusionist” by Millhauser. It’s the kernel of a story upon which the movie The Illusionist is based. Millhauser does a lot of work not saying things in his stories. I find him intriguing, but tiring. Savvy Verse & Wit featured a poem by Christopher Merrill which makes me wish I could be poetical about ultimate frisbee.

What I’m Giving Up On:

Good Night, Mr. Holmes by Caroline Nelson Douglas. I started this book at the end of last year, read 69 pages, and put it down. When I picked up again a couple weeks back, I just couldn’t bring myself to weave through the prose again.

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