How One Thinks of Good Things

Been thinking about this article from Scientific American: What If I’d Never Met My Husband.

The researchers show that people prompted to write about how a positive event may not have happened experience a greater uptick in mood than those prompted to describe the positive event.

It occurred to me while discussing it with Eric that I’m not very good at this sort of game. When discussing the possibility of, for example, not meeting him, I don’t see the resulting future as necessarily worse than my present. Or better than my present. It would be very different, but with it’s own good and bad. I suppose I do experience an uptake in mood when considering the possibilities because the exercise does highlight the things I do like about my life. But is there a chicken/egg relationship between my general dysphoria and the way I see such hypotheticals?

—###—

In the land of recounting good things:

We went to Four Peaks last night for dinner. I wanted chicken salad, and battered french fries sounded good in the way that high potassium foods do after sweaty exercise.

(Had a pretty good morning of disc. My compatriots might not agree since the numbers were a little thin, but I had fun. The timing of my cuts seemed better than it has been. It would be nice if that continues tonight. I’m still having problems with my short backhand. I had an easy put to Reif, who had worked to get open on Nabity, and totally biffed it. I need to improve that without getting neurotic about it.)

Since the weather was less than scalding, we walked. By the time we reached the restaurant, I had decided to have a beer. Usually, that’s an easy choice, but I’m trying to be slightly fiscally responsible and figured it was an expense to cut. Until beer sounded good in the way that beer can after sweaty exercise. As is habit at Four Peaks, I asked if there was any seasonal brew available. There was, and it’s possibly the best beer I’ve had. It is a bourbon-barrel-aged Kiltlifter. In general, Kiltlifter is one of my favorites. It’s a flavorful amber with a decent alcohol percentage and little bite. The waitress described the barrel-aged version as having a noticeable whiskey taste. Not a whiskey drinker, I can’t tell if it did or didn’t. What the bourbon-barrel Kiltlifter did have was a tiny bit more sweetness and a smoothness that I’m not sure I’ve previously experience in beer. Eric tasted it and agreed that if he were forced to drink a beer, that one might be it. High praise indeed from Eric.

2 thoughts on “How One Thinks of Good Things

  1. Anonymous

    Eric tasted it and agreed that if he were forced to drink a beer, that one might be it. High praise indeed from Eric.

    Thank you for making me laugh gatorade through my nose. 🙂

    Reply

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