While Reading The Devil’s Teeth:

The chance to be with people who possessed these elegant survival skills, I realized, was a big part of what had drawn me here. This was an oasis of competence in a bumbling world, clean and straight where things were usually compromised and bent.

Susan Casey, The Devil’s Teeth, pg. 169

The Popinjay’s Daughter, by Anne Cross

Day 51: The Popinjay’s Daughter by Anne Cross « 365 Days of Women Writers.

Beneath Ceaseless Skies : : The Popinjay’s Daughter, by Anne Cross (Issue #55, Nov. 4, 2010).

First person POV.

Trapped by change. Interesting concept.
Was totally thrown off by the narrator being male. Would I have assumed male if the author was male? What would I have assumed if I didn’t know the gender of the author?

“the boy who was locked up”

The only boy to be locked up?

The comment about change between pregnant and mother. Doesn’t strike me as a male thought.

Is a male protag needed? Is the taking on of a daughter more poignant because he’s male?

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Chance brings up the “you can do whatever you want to women if you are powerful” trope. I suppose that’s a trope for me to watch out for.