Throwback Thursday (12/06/12)

Throwback Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by The Housework Can Wait and Never Too Fond of Books!

Noting that book blogging often focuses on new releases, here’s how Throwback Thursday works:

  1. Updated! Pick any media (or non-media item) released more than 5 years ago. Remember to keep it book-related!
  2. Write up a short summary of the book (include the title, author, and cover art) and an explanation of why you love it.
  3. Link up your post at The Housework Can Wait or Never Too Fond of Books.
  4. Visit as many blogs as you can, reminisce about books you loved, and discover some “new” books for your TBR list!

The Last Unicorn

Novel by Peter S. Beagle, Movie by Rankin/Bass

I was seven years old when The Last Unicorn premiered in 1982. While my mother was a voracious  reader of science fiction, she didn’t care much for fantasy and I was unfamiliar with this “classic tale.” I liked unicorns. I had gleaned the school library and the public library reference books for the stories about them and come up with very little. This was a disappointment in comparison to the mythology of Pegasus. There was certainly nothing in the medieval tales about a fiery red bull.*

Regardless, I was pretty excited to go see this movie. My grandpa took be to see it. Going to animated films at the Park 4 (mostly the Disney re-releases) was a thing we did together. The movie was fantastic, and for a couple of months, the Red Bull featured prominently in my bad dreams.** It was an immediate purchase when it came out on video disc and I’m sure my parents got pretty tired of my commandeering the TV to watch it.

It didn’t really realize that the movie was based on a book until I was in high school. I couldn’t find anything by this Beagle guy in the library or bookstores. This was the 80s and early 90s. I didn’t even have a brick & mortar superstore like Barnes & Noble to visit. I didn’t find a copy of the book until my first visit to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Memorial Union bookstore during the summer before my freshman year in college, over a decade after seeing the movie. On the way to the cash register, carrying a huge and heavy stack of textbooks, I stopped at the science fiction/fantasy rack in the non-textbook area. There is was. I started reading it on the car ride back to Omaha.

As a kid I loved the unicorn. She’s beautiful and brave and goes on an adventure. As an adult, I love the human characters. Each deals with the concept of destiny in a slightly different way. Both are good. And, because this is the 21st century, both are happily available.

*It seems strange to me now that I didn’t look at the *fiction* sections of the library. Or at least the fiction sections of the public library. My school library was teeny-tiny. But I was very caught up in knowing the origin of things, rather than exploring the extensions of them.
**Looking back at my childhood, the things that freaked me out the most were cartoons. The Red Bull. The animated Headless Horseman. Scooby Doo’s giggling green ghosts. The Ghost of Christmas Yet-to-Come (about the 17:00 mark). I was an odd child.

4 thoughts on “Throwback Thursday (12/06/12)

  1. Jonathan @ I Read a Book Once

    Don’t feel bad. The Evil Queen/Witch in Snow White freaked me out when I was 4. And I made my parents play a Christmas clay-mation TV special over and over and over again–even after the holiday season. Kids like repetition, I guess. I know my little boy certainly does. I swear, we read “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish” at least once a day. 🙂

    Reply

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