Nonfiction November 2019 ~ Week 4

Week 4: (Nov. 18 to 22) – What Makes a Favorite?

Hosted by Leeann at Shelf Aware

We’ve talked about how you pick nonfiction books in previous years, but this week I’m excited to talk about what makes a book you’ve read one of your favorites. Is the topic pretty much all that matters? Are there particular ways a story can be told or particular writing styles that you love? Do you look for a light, humorous approach or do you prefer a more serious tone? Let us know what qualities make you add a nonfiction book to your list of favorites.

I like stories that are told (or topics that are explored) within wider context.

Erik Larson’s books are prime examples of this. In The Devil in the White City, for example, it’s not not just the story of the Chicago World’s Fair or just the story of H. H. Holmes, but the combination of the two—and how one enabled the other.

Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible and Learned to Disappear The Magician and the Cardsharp: The Search for America's Greatest Sleight-of-Hand Artist

Even within my favorite topic, magic history, the best books aren’t the ones about the doings of a single magician. Jim Steinmeyer’s Hiding the Elephant looks at the golden age of magic through the lens of a single trick: Houdini’s disappearing elephant. One of my favorite biographies, The Magician and the Cardsharp by Karl Johnson, is about Dai Vernon and his search for a gambler who could deal cards from the center of a deck of cards.

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age

One last example: I’ve read quite a few biographies of Nikola Tesla and some of them are quite good, but my favorite is W. Bernard Carlson’s Tesla: Inventor of the Electric Age, which puts Tesla’s major inventions in the context of the wider political and economical world. It also goes deeper into electrical engineering than I’m comfortable with, but I respect that about it.

12 thoughts on “Nonfiction November 2019 ~ Week 4

    1. Yes, more or less. The exact method was kind of lost/successfully obscured, but Steinmeyer reverse engineers it. If you don’t want to know too much about how magic is done, Hiding the Elephant isn’t a good book. 😉

  1. tbretc

    The Devil in the White City was a treat! I was looking forward to the H.H. Holmes angle, but learning about the World’s Fair in Chicago was a nice surprise.

  2. Lisbeth Ekelöf

    I agree on a story in a wider context. I always wanted to read something by Eric Larson. Just don’t know why I have not go along with it. His books seem very interesting, and since he is rather popular, I take for granted he is a good writer. Thank you for guiding him to me again.

  3. Pingback: Non Fiction November- New to My TBR

  4. Pingback: #NonficNov- New To My TBR + Wrap Up | book'd out

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