Down the TBR Hole 17

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

The Amazing Harvey: A Mystery

The Amazing Harvey: A Mystery by Don Passman

It’s a mystery with a magcian characters. If it weren’t a little hard to find, I probably would have already bought it! KEEP.

Born of Illusion (Born of Illusion, #1)

Born of Illusion by Teri Brown

She’s an illusionist, her mother is a renowned medium, and oh, I didn’t realize that this was set in Jazz age New York. But it does have a paranormal aspect… KEEP, since it’s available on Hoopla.

Mr. Fox

Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi

I don’t remember why this book was on my Wishlist. It might be good, but I don’t think it’s anything I’m ever going to get to. GO.

The Metamorphosis: The Apprenticeship of Harry Houdini

The Metamorphosis: The Apprenticeship of Harry Houdini by Bruce Macnab

I have a few Houdini books. I’m kind of tired of Houdini. This is about his early career, but do I need to know more about his early career? GO.

Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day

Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory

I usually don’t fall for a cover, but I *really* like this cover. Fantasy and magical realism short stories? Sounds like a future Deal Me In list. KEEP.

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Down the TBR Hole 16

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

alt text Catch Me If You Can by Frank W. Abagnale

I have a soft, soft, soft spot for con men. Which explains this book and the next. Both of which I’m KEEPing. (Happily, this one is available at the digital library!)

The Big Con cover The Big Con: The Story of the Confidence Man by David W. Maurer

Not only am I interested in the type of person that is a con man, but what vulnerabilities make the average person fall for their schemes. KEEP.

You Will Never See Any God cover You Will Never See Any God: Stories by Ervin D. Krause

I can understand why this ended up on my wishlist: midwest writer with Nebraska ties. But man, this just seems grim. I don’t think I can do grim right now. GO.

Illusion Show cover Illusion Show: A Life in Magic by David Bamberg

A magician’s autobiography.
\_(ツ)_/
KEEP.

alt text The Secret History of Las Vegas by Chris Abani

I was interested in crime novels set in Vegas, but the yen has somewhat passed. GO.

Anyone have any experience with any of these? Any arguments for KEEP or GO?

Down the TBR Hole 15

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

The Serialist cover The Serialist by David Gordon

Hmm, this still sounds pretty good: a pulp writer who is working on a serial killer’s memoir has to get to the bottom of new murders. Even if it is possibly on the literary side, KEEP.

The Poisoned Island cover The Poisoned Island by Lloyd Shepherd

I’m always looking for a mystery with some interesting element. This one: 1812 London with some connection to burgeoning scientific efforts. KEEP.

The Winter People cover The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon

Modern day connection to events a hundred years ago… It’s a trope that I’m not too keen on lately. GO.

The Mad Sculptor cover The Mad Sculptor: The Maniac, the Model, and the Murder that Shook the Nation by Harold Schechter

I don’t think I already own a book about a sensational murder in the 30s. Sounds good and pulpy. KEEP.

The Bohemians cover The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature by Ben Tarnoff

I feel like I should want to read this book, and maybe it’s because I’m just finishing up a broad book about the 1830s, but I think this one is going to have to GO.

Anyone have any experience with any of these? Any arguments for KEEP or GO?

Down the TBR Hole 14

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

Empty Mansions cover Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman & Paul Clark Newell Jr.

Nonfiction about a 19th century industrialist family. I was going to say “go” but I’m sucked back in. KEEP.

A Very British Murder cover A Very British Murder by Lucy Worsley

On the other hand, this one doesn’t *quite* seem as interesting as when I added it. I think I’d rather just read Victorian literature. GO.

The Golden Day cover The Golden Day by Ursula Dubosarsky

Hmm… Yeah… I can kind of see why I added this to my list, but sounds a little more literary than I care for. GO.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell cover Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke

Look, we all cave to peer pressure sometimes. Adding this book to my TBR list is an example. I know a lot of people have enjoyed this book, but I doubt I’m ever going to want to invest the time in this 1000 page behemoth. GO.

Budapest cover Budapest by Chico Buarque, Alison Entrekin (Translation)

Wait, what? GO.

Kind of a Monday bloodbath in the TBR Hole…

Anyone have experience with any of these? Arguments for KEEP or GO?

Down the TBR Hole 13

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

cover The Ruins The Ruins by Scott B. Smith

If Goodreads allowed me to search my lists by genre (or most commonly tagged genre, or whatever), I probably would have already read this book for Spring into Horror, R.eaders I.mbibing P.eril, or one of my other favorite horror readathons. KEEP.

cover Doctor Who: Beautiful Chaos Doctor Who: Beautiful Chaos by Gary Russell

Is it sacrilege to say that I’m a bit off Doctor Who? Even when it’s Ten and Donna? GO.

cover Victorian Magic Victorian Magic by Geoffrey Frederick Lamb

Considering that this book is now in the land of over-priced textbooks, I should dump it on principle. But, no. Victorian magic is one of my favorite topics. KEEP.

cover The Asylum The Asylum by John Harwood

I’ll be honest, I’ve tried to get into this book a few times and it’s never worked out despite liking some of Harwood’s other works. Time to GO.

cover Astronaut Wives Club The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel

This is on my TBR because I wanted to learn more about the Mercury Seven. And I still do! KEEP.

Anyone have any experience with any of these? Any arguments for KEEP or GO?

Down the TBR Hole 12

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

Cover: Ratcatcher by James McGee Ratcatcher by James McGee

I’m still a little intrigued by a story of Regency era crime, but will I actually ever get to it? Probably not. GO.

Cover: The First Psychic by Peter Lamont The First Psychic: The Peculiar Mystery Of A Victorian Wizard by Peter Lamont

I’ve only read two books by Peter Lamont (The Rise of the Indian Rope Trick and Magic In Theory), but he’s one of my favorite writers on magical subjects. KEEP.

Cover: Extraordinary Beliefs by Peter Lamont Extraordinary Beliefs: A Historical Approach to a Psychological Problem by Peter Lamont

Same as the above. KEEP. Alas, these two books are “out of print”-ish. Extraordinary Beliefs is available in a Kindle edition for the scholarly price of $21.49.

Cover: Pantomime by Laura Lam Pantomime by Laura Lam

At a certain point I added a lot of circus novels to my pile. None have stuck around, but I’m KEEPing Pantomime. It feels like the kind of YA I enjoy every once in a while.

Cover: Fadeout by Joseph Hansen Fadeout by Joseph Hansen

There are two things that led to my adding this book in the first place: the main character is “an insurance investigator who is contentedly gay.” Emphasis is mine. An investigator who isn’t police (or a not-related-to-investigation profession)  and a gay character who isn’t tortured by it. KEEP.

Only one cut. Slow week. Anyone have any experience with any of these? Any arguments for KEEP or GO?

Down the TBR Hole 11

TBRHole

This is a meme started by Lia at Lost in a Story. The “rules” are:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’m modifying this a little since my to-read shelf is a mess of books that are mostly in storage. Instead, I’m going to look at my wishlist—all those books I add on a whim during my travels around the book blogging community—and weed out the ones that don’t quite sound as good now. The “keepers” I’m going to look for at online libraries or add to my Amazon wishlist.

The Candle Man by Alex Scarrow The Candle Man by Alex Scarrow

I seem to remember a reader I respect recommending Alex Scarrow, though I don’t remember who it was. In any case, the combination of the Ripper murders and the sinking of the Titanic still seems compelling. KEEP (even though it seems very out of print).

 

Seduction by M.J. Rose Seduction by M.J. Rose

This is book five in a series. I’ve sworn off fiction books with historical characters. Yet… Victor Hugo and séances. KEEP.

Delia's Shadow by Jaime Lee Moyer Delia’s Shadow by Jaime Lee Moyer

I have an overage of historical fiction that I want to read (see above) or that I already own. GO.

The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley

“But when his friend’s beautiful older sister enlists him as the unwitting messenger in her illicit love affair, the aftershocks will be felt for years.”

Honestly, this doesn’t seem like my type of novel. GO. (But at least the cover features a whole face, if not a whole head.)

Parlor Games by Maryka Biaggio Parlor Games by Maryka Biaggio

And this is why Delia’s Shadow had to go: yet another historical, but with a female con artist. KEEP.

So, what do YOU think? Any arguments for KEEP or GO?